Dinanderie

  • Handicraft

Dinanderie emerged in Morocco in the 12th century and became a true specialty from the 14th century onwards. It refers to the artistic work done with copper, brass, silver, lead, tinplate, iron, tin, maillechort, or aluminum, using various tools, primarily hammers. Artisans melt the metal, then hammer or chisel it to create utilitarian and decorative objects that are fascinating and the result of the genius and expertise of Moroccan Maâllems (master craftsmen): round trays known as ‘Soigni,’ kettles, teapots, tea and sugar boxes, candle holders, pots, lamps, cauldrons, copper fountains, and more.

On a regional scale, Tiznit takes the lead, with a distinctly regional character giving rise to rural artisanal items, including the irreplaceable pot called ‘Tikinte,’ which is found in every traditional household in the region.

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