Igoudars

Remnants of the past, the “igoudars” bear witness to an ancestral history and a centuries-old tradition. Preserved over time, they reflect both an architectural and societal culture. They are collective granaries in the form of citadels, most often watched over by a “lamine,” which literally means a trusted man. They were used to store foodstuffs, crops of wheat, corn, and barley, oil, jewelry, and valuable documents. Due to their fortified shape, they provided an ideal refuge and a reliable shelter for the provisions and belongings of the populations of the douars against the temptations of brigands.

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The management of “igoudars” reveals exceptional organization. Indeed, the trusted man “lamine” who watches over the granary is paid in kind. Thus, the inhabitants remunerate him with a portion of their harvest. To maintain the granaries against the dreaded invasions of mice and pests, the Granary Lamine is supposed to domesticate cats, for which he receives an additional share called “The Cat’s Portion.”

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These collective granaries number in the hundreds in the Souss Massa region. Starting from Agadir, several are easily accessible, after less than an hour’s drive, on the road to Aït Baha, particularly the one in Imchguigueln or Afella Ouzaghar.

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The architectural techniques and materials used in the construction of these granaries are local and blend harmoniously with the landscape. Roofs made of argan wood twigs, miniature doors made of thuja or oak wood, tree trunks as pillars or stairs… Nothing leaves you indifferent. Due to these characteristics, these heritage masterpieces, once primarily valued for their functionality, now constitute a true architectural curiosity and a favored tourist destination.

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